Practice Setting a Key Factor for Early Career Nephrologists

By Kurtis Pivert posted 10-03-2018 07:41

  

ASN released the latest nephrology workforce analysis, entitled Early Career Nephrologists: Results of a 2017 Survey. George Washington University researchers found practice setting was a key factor influencing income and job satisfaction. “The survey revealed significant differences between nephrologists working in group practices compared to those in academic positions,” said GW-HWI principal investigator Edward Salsberg, MPA. “After reviewing other factors—including gender, location/type of education (US medical graduate [USMG] vs. international medical graduate [IMG]), and length of time since graduation—practice setting is a major factor influencing educational pathways, current practice characteristics, and satisfaction.”

The report details significant differences between nephrologists beginning their careers in group practices compared to those starting in academic positions. The report noted the differences between these two groups of nephrologists included income, hours worked, job satisfaction, and whether they would recommend the specialty.   “The survey revealed significant differences between nephrologists working in group practices compared to those in academic positions,” said GW-HWI principal investigator Edward Salsberg, MPA. “After reviewing other factors—including gender, location/type of education (US medical graduate [USMG] vs. international medical graduate [IMG]), and length of time since graduation—practice setting is a major factor influencing educational pathways, current practice characteristics, and satisfaction.”

The report is the latest in a series ASN has produced in collaboration with GW-HWI. “Both group practice and academic nephrologists were satisfied or very satisfied with the intellectual challenges (92.6% and 93.3% respectively) and with their relationships with patients (91% and 94.5% respectively),” said Salsberg. “On the other hand, income and lifestyle were challenging for many nephrologists.”

Some other key findings include:

  • In general, USMGs were more likely to practice in academic settings, while IMGs were more likely to practice in group practices.
  • Nephrologists in group practices were more likely to work longer hours as well as weekends and evenings but they also had a greater income.
  • Nephrologists in academic settings are more satisfied with their positions and may trade off work hours and income for lifestyle considerations.

Academic practitioners are more likely to have had three or more years of nephrology fellowship training than group practice nephrologists.

As expected, the vast majority of group practice nephrologists have a path to partnership (77%), while this is rare for those in academic practice (5.7%).

The survey targeted nephrologists who completed their training between 2011 and 2016.

To download a copy of the survey results and analysis, go to:  https://www.asn-online.org/education/training/workforce/Nephrology_Early_Career_Survey_Report_2018.pdf

Kurtis Pivert is the Data Science Officer for the American Society of Nephrology



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